Tips to Help Your Child Understand Trigonometry

Trigonometric concepts were first used by Greek and Indian astronomers. Its applications can be found all through geometric concepts. Trigonometry has an intricate relationship with infinite series, complex numbers, logarithms and calculus.

Knowledge of Trigonometry is useful in many fields like navigation, land survey, measuring heights and distances, oceanography and architecture. Having ground knowledge in the subject is good for the future academic and career prospects of students.

Trigonometry has basic functions like cosine, sine, tangent, cosecant, secant and cotangent. Learning all these six functions without fault is the way to do success in doing Trigonometry.

Making a child understand Trigonometry is not a difficult task if one follows certain tips as follows.

1. Helping the child understand triangles with life examples: There are many objects that contain right-angled triangles and non right ones in the world. Showing the child a church spire or dome and asking the child to understand what a triangle is the easiest way to make a child understand the fundamentals of Trigonometry.

2. Brushing up Algebra and Geometry skills: Before starting Trigonometry, students should be confident of their basic skills in Algebra and Geometry to cope with the first classes in the subject. A student has to concentrate on algebraic manipulation and geometric properties like circle, interior and exterior angles of polygon and types of triangles like equilateral, isosceles and scalene. Algebraic manipulation is a basic mathematical skill required for entering any branch of Math. A basic knowledge of Geometry is equally important for understanding the basics of Trigonometry.

3. A good knowledge of right-angled triangles: To understand Trigonometry better, a student should start with right-angled triangles and understand their three sides (hypotenuse and the two legs of the triangle). The essential aspect of it is that hypotenuse is the biggest side of the right triangle.

4. Knowing the basic ratios: Sine, cosine and tangent are the mantra of Trigonometry. These three functions are the base of Trigonometry. Making a child understand these ratios with perfect comprehension helps the child move on to difficult topics with ease. The sine of an angle is the ratio of the length of the side opposite to the length of the hypotenuse. The cosine of an angle is the ratio of the length of the side next to the length of hypotenuse. The tangent is the ratio of the sine of the angle to the cosine of the angle.

5. Understanding non right triangles: Knowing sine rules and cosine rules helps a student do non- right triangles without difficulty. As such, children learn other three ratios (cosecant, secant and cotangent). Next, they have to move on measure angles in radians and then solving Trigonometry equations and thus their understanding Trigonometry becomes complete and perfect.

Practice plays a major role in understanding Trigonometry functions. Rote memorization of formulas does not lead to success in learning Trigonometry. Basic understanding of right triangles and non right triangles in the context of life situations helps students do Trigonometry without hassle.

With the online interactive learning methods available for understanding Trigonometry, it is not a hard task to learn the subject. If it is all the more threatening, students could access Trigonometry online tutoring services and understand the subject without hassle.

Helping Your Pre-Schooler With Math-Read Math With Your Child

We have already discussed the importance of developing a good math foundation for your preschoolers. The first, easiest, and best way to add math into your child's early life is to add math to the reading you already do with your child. It is never too early to begin reading to your child, and it is never too early to add math concepts to that reading.

It isn't necessary to run out and buy a bunch of preschool math books, although you might mention to friends and relatives that math related story books would be a good gift idea. You probably already have books with math concepts. For example, Goldilocks and the Three Bears is a wonderful story for introducing math concepts. It allows for early counting. It has size comparisons with too little, too big, and just right. It has one-to-one matching with baby bear and the little bed. Certainly you won't use this terminology, but as you read you can point out these concepts. Three Blind Mice , Three Little Pigs , Three Little Kittens , and Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed are other good examples you might already have.

Before spending lots of money on books, I suggest checking your local public library. You can check out books, read them with your child, and if the book seems to be one of those books your child wants you to read over and over, THEN you can buy it. Certainly use your library before buying anything you haven't read from online sources.

If you are interested in buying your own math related books, I have several suggestions. I am a big fan of Dr. Seuss books. Hand, Hand, Fingers, Thumb introduces large numbers. Ten Apples Up On Top! is a good counting book. One fish two fish red fish blue fish is good for counting and colors. Horton Hears a Who! even introduces the concept of infinity. Many other Dr. Seuss books contain number concepts, colors, and shapes for reading with your child.

You may have read about or heard of Baby Einstein. If so, you need to know that having your young child watching the videos is a very bad idea ! Research is showing that there should be NO SCREEN TIME for children under two and very limited time for the older child. However, the Baby Einstein My First Book of Numbers is a wonderful example of what a number picture book should be.

The Sesame Street book ABC and 1 2 3 is also an excellent math related picture book.

As you look into buying math picture books, there are some things you need to consider. The book should be colorful, interesting to you, and it needs to make sense – not just rhyme. Don't assume that because it is about numbers that it is a good book. For example, I came across a book called One, Two, Three! by Sandra Boyton. I actually got confused as I read! One line said "… and when you want to explore, the number you need is FOUR." WHY? What does four have to do with exploring? Another page said "Seven is perfect for a play." Again, I questioned what that even meant. Any book you pick needs to be something you can talk about with your child. Choose books that you can read with enthusiasm. If a book doesn't make sense to you, don't buy it. I want to reiterate that it is not necessary to buy lots of number related books because you can find number concepts like counting and making comparisons in virtually any book.

As you read to your child, you should work on what is called "the language of space." This refers to words like front, back, top, bottom, over, under, in front of, behind, first, last, in, on, corner, edge, surface, and so on. These are all important concepts for your child to understand when they start school. They can't line up behind the blue line if they don't know what 'behind' means.

When you are reading to your child, be sure to:

  1. Hold your child in your lap.
  2. Convey to your child how much you enjoy your reading time together.
  3. Read everyday.
  4. Get involved with the story. Read with lots of enthusiasm and expression. Use different voices. Be active by pointing out things on the pages. Ask questions.
  5. Pay attention to your child's responses. Know when to put the book away. If your child loses interest, do something different.
  6. Be prepared to read the same book over and over and be enthusiastic each time.

Above all else, make reading FUN!